Skip to main content

http://momsfightback.org/">Moms Fight Back

http://momsfightback.org/">Moms Fight Back

http://momsfightback.org/">Moms Fight Back

0

Protecting Our Teen Daughters from Date Rape

Imagine sending your teenage daughter out on what she anticipates to be a fun, carefree date with a friend, new crush, or boyfriend only to receive her home confused, emotionally bruised and sexually assaulted. Date and acquaintance rape doesn’t always leave visible signs or scars, and it isn’t always reported, but that doesn’t make it any less traumatic.

According to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology:

One in fifteen U.S. women between the ages of 12 years and 17 years are reported as rape victims.

As a mother, it can be a stretch to imagine your daughter to potentially be one of those statistics, but as a mother, it’s crucially important to be aware of the possibility and help educate your children about this often little-talked-about crime.

Date rape is defined as: forced or coerced sex within a dating relationship. In 2010, 48 percent of all rape or sexual assault crimes against female victims were committed by friends or acquaintances, reports the National Center for Victims of Crime.

In 2010, 48 percent of all rape or sexual assault crimes against females were committed by friends or acquaintances.

Date and acquaintance rape can occur in any circumstance, on any day, at any time, and in the most unlikely of places. Forcing anyone to have sex is rape, plain and simple, but there are other more insidious ways that date rape can occur that many moms aren’t even aware of: date rape drugs. Date rape drugs remove the issue of ‘force’ from the equation, often leaving the victim unaware or uncertain of what exactly has happened to her.

Date Rape

Date Rape Drugs

Different types of drugs are often used in a date rape assault. Some date rape drugs can actually render the victim unconscious and unable to defend themselves.

The four most common date rape drugs are:

  • Rohypnol (also referred to as Roofies or Roach)
  • Ketamine (Also referred to as Kit-Kat, Special K or “K”)
  • GHB (Gammahydroxybutrate also referred to as Gibb or Easy Lay)
  • Alcohol (Yes, alcohol. Any drug that impairs a victim’s ability to set limits and make decisions can create risk for date rape. Alcohol is the most common drug contributed to sexual assaults.)

These drugs (with the exception of alcohol) are odorless and tasteless and can be easily poured into a drink undetected. The ingestion of these drugs can make the victim feel highly intoxicated, confused, dizzy and/or tired in a short amount of time. Victims who experienced date rape drugs describe difficulty staying awake and blackouts. These date rape drugs also have an amnesia-like effect on the body so the victim will often not remember what happened during the assault.

How Can a Mom Protect Her Child from Date Rape?

If you’re the mom of a teen you know better than anyone that teens can be particularly defensive when it comes to serious conversations, they also often exhibit a sense of being indestructible. With that in mind, engage the topic as a conversation – avoid lecturing. The potential danger is the same, but the way your teen receives the information you have to share is what will make all the difference.

Although this may feel like an especially tough subject to bring up and discuss with your teen or tween daughter, here are some suggestions for you to share with your child to help bring awareness and reduce the chance of her becoming a victim of date rape.

— Don’t accept open drinks (alcoholic or non-alcoholic) from others who you do not know or do not trust; this includes drinks that come in a glass.

— When in bars or clubs always get your drink directly from the bartender and do not take your eyes off the bartender or your order; don’t use the waitress or let somebody go to the bar for you.

— At parties, only accept drinks in closed containers that have not been opened yet: bottles, cans or tetra packs.

— Never leave your drink unattended or turn your back on your drink.

–Do not drink from open sources like punch bowls, pitchers or tubs.

— Keep your eyes and ears open; if there is talk of date rape drugs or if friends seem “too intoxicated” for what they have ingested, leave the party or club immediately and don’t go back!

— At parties, only drink from a glass that you personally poured.

–Trust your feelings and if you feeling uncomfortable for any reason, leave the party.

Discuss with your child what to do if she is at a party or out on a date and she starts to feel dizzy, confused or rapidly becomes sick. Make it easy, comfortable, and safe for your child to contact you for a ride home. Oftentimes teens will not contact their parents for help for fear or getting ‘in trouble’ or being judged.

As a mom, you know it’s vitally important to keep the communication open with your child and remind them that while you may be angry with a decision they’ve made you will be there for them when they need you.

Encourage your child to discuss date and acquaintance rape as well as date rape drugs with her friends – the further the information goes, the safer our children are.

To learn more about date rape, how to help protect and inform your children, and what to do if your teenage daughter is a victim, visit the links below:

RAINN: Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network

National Sexual Assault Hotline1.800.656.HOPE

The National Center for Victims of Crime

After Silence – online support group

Girls Health: Date Rape Information and Resources – The Office of Women’s Health

Survivor of Date Rape – Church organization

Survivor Stories

0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

two × 4 =